South Dakota
Birds and Birding
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Blackpoll Warbler

Dendroica striata

Length: 5.25 inches Wingspan: 8.5 inches Seasonality: Migrant
ID Keys: Black cap, white cheeks, white underparts with black side streaks, 2 white wing-bars

Blackpoll Warbler - Dendroica striataBlackpoll Warblers are a champion migrant, often going non-stop from the Northeastern coast of the U.S. to northern South America every fall.  Blackpoll Warblers are usually fairly common in Spring migration through South Dakota.  A male is depicted in the photo to the right.  Photos of females can be seen in the additional photographs at the bottom of the page.

Habitat: Deciduous woodlands, parks, gardens in migration.  Stays in conifer forests and thickets on breeding grounds in Canada and Alaska.

Diet: Mostly insects and berries, including aphids, beetles, mosquitoes, ants, termites, and spiders.  Will also eat seeds on occasion.

Behavior: Moves deliberately along foliage and branches of trees and shrubs, gleaning insects from the vegetation as it goes.  Also is capable of flycatching, flying out from a perch and capturing insects in mid-air.

Breeding Map: Non-breeder in South Dakota

Song: Blackpoll Warbler Song

Migration: Summers in central to northern Canada, winters northern South America.

Similar Species: Black-and-White Warbler, Black-throated Gray Warbler

Conservation Status: Still widespread and common, but surveys show declines in some areas in recent decades.

Further Information: 1) USGS Patuxent Bird Identification InfoCenter, Blackpoll Warbler

2) Cornell University's "All About Birds - Blackpoll Warbler"

3) eNature.com: Blackpoll Warbler

Photo Information: May 13, 2005 -- Minnehaha County -- Terry L. Sohl

Additional Photos: Click on the image chips or text links below for additional, higher-resolution Blackpoll Warbler photos.

 

Click on the map below for a higher-resolution view
Blackpoll Warbler - Range Map
South Dakota Status: Common spring migrant in the eastern part of the state, rare in the west.  Much less common fall migrant.